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 A Royal Affair

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BeerIsFood
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PostSubject: A Royal Affair   Wed May 30, 2012 8:51 pm

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Empress of Cornwall
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PostSubject: Re: A Royal Affair   Thu May 31, 2012 12:03 am

Lucky monkeys

Stateside we won't get this til November! Sad Evil or Very Mad Mad Crying or Very sad
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madsaddicted
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PostSubject: Re: A Royal Affair   Thu May 31, 2012 1:39 am

We will probably have to wait the DVD version Crying or Very sad
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PostSubject: Re: A Royal Affair   Fri Jun 01, 2012 3:50 am

http://www.bfi.org.uk/whatson/bfi_southbank/events/previews_in_conversation/preview_a_royal_affair

If you're in London, you can see the film on the 11th June at the BFI

Preview: A Royal Affair

A gripping chapter of Danish history is recounted in this sumptuous costume drama.

11 Jun 18:15 NFT1

A sumptuous costume drama based on a true story of late 1760s Danish court intrigue. Teenage Queen Caroline Mathilde is married off to simpleton King Christian VII. Uninterested in his bride, he brutally fathers a child and heir and the insanity of his behaviour soon requires a doctor. German physician Johann is brought in to treat the King and falls in love with the well-liked Queen. Trusted by King Christian, Johann's responsibilities place him in a position to push through reforms that will transform Denmark forever.

Director Nikolaj Arcel
Cast Mads Mikkelsen, Mikkel Boe Følsgaard, Alicia Vikander
Distributor Courtesy of Metrodome
Country Denmark-Sweden-Czech Republic-Germany
Year 2012
Running time 128min
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BeerIsFood
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PostSubject: Re: A Royal Affair   Sat Jun 02, 2012 12:17 am

Translated article:
How good is he in bed?

Alicia Vikander came very close to the Danish superstar and reveals how it was
By Michella Meier Thursday 29th March 2012 15:20
SEOGHØR.DK Mads Mikkelsen is a man that many women would like to close. This has been true for as long as the handsome gentleman has been shown on film and TV.

And just close encounter with Mads was the Swedish actress Alicia Vikander when she played Queen Caroline Mathilde in the movie "A royal affair" which premieres today. During the filming was the 23-year-old Swede making some hot sex scenes with her twice as old medskuespiller.

- Mads was just so sweet, very down to earth and so cool about everyone on the team, said Alicia, as she came to the gala premiere in Copenhagen cinema Imperial last night.

- I do not know how wild I think mine and Mads' sex scenes are. They are hot on screen, but every time you make the kind of scenes, it is very technical. It is one of the few scenes during a movie, where you can not improvise. It's all choreographed to the smallest detail, she explained.

Despite the fact that everything was timed and organized down to the smallest detail, was the sex scenes border to record.

He is a handsome man and he was really good to me along the way. So I was very comfortable, even when it is transnational. It was a good experience, smiled Alicia.
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PostSubject: Re: A Royal Affair   Sat Jun 02, 2012 2:01 am

"Many women would like to close..." BRILLIANT

BIF
Why am I not terribly surprised that you posted this article? And why am I ever less surprised that I rushed to read it? tongue Razz Shocked Surprised Very Happy Laughing Laughing Laughing

LOL
EOC
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madsaddicted
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PostSubject: Re: A Royal Affair   Sat Jun 02, 2012 2:26 am

Lucky Alicia!!
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BeerIsFood
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PostSubject: Re: A Royal Affair   Sat Jun 02, 2012 10:10 am

Empress of Cornwall wrote:
"Many women would like to close..." BRILLIANT

BIF
Why am I not terribly surprised that you posted this article? And why am I ever less surprised that I rushed to read it? tongue Razz Shocked Surprised Very Happy Laughing Laughing Laughing

LOL
EOC

Well, I actually stumbled upon it by accident through another interview, and thought it a bit salacious...but then, I knew us gals had a good sense of humour, so we'd get it.. Wink
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PostSubject: Re: A Royal Affair   Sat Jun 02, 2012 12:33 pm

lol!
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Lisbeth Salander
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PostSubject: Re: A Royal Affair   Tue Jun 05, 2012 2:54 pm

Sneaky Look At ‘A Royal Affair’ (Nothing To Do With The Royal Family, Unfortunately!) There's a tiny video, no Mads though.
'If you get the king to visit your bed chamber..' I always thought the mother is the one who's saying that!

Edit:

Here's the article:

Quote :
Sneaky Look At ‘A Royal Affair’ (Nothing To Do With The Royal Family, Unfortunately!)

Published On: Tue, May 29th, 2012 by: Jazmine Sky Bradley

This weekend may be filled with Jubilee celebrations, but when it’s over it doesn’t mean this royal obsession has to stop. Nikolaj Arcel’s A ROYAL AFFAIR is out at the beginning of June and here we have a quick clip to show you, taken from the film.

Mads Mikkelsen (THE THREE MUSKETEERS) stars as Johann Friedrich Struensee, a trustee and advisor to King Christian VII of Denmark (played by Mikkel Følsgaard). Christian is set to marry Caroline Mathilde (Alicia Vikander – ANNA KARENINA) but things get royally messy when Miss Caroline falls for Johann. The clip below shows us Caroline asking for some advice – and receiving a surprising answer.

The film competed at the 62nd Berlin International Film Festival, where Følsgaard won the Silver Bear for Best Actor and the film won Best Script. With these award already behind it, could we expect more nominations after its release? Will you be going to see it? Let us know!

Source: The Hollywood News
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Luin
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PostSubject: Re: A Royal Affair   Fri Jun 08, 2012 12:59 am

There are only some few days left, till it will start in the UK. I wish I could see it again. Crying or Very sad

But I found at amazon, that there will be a 2-Disc-Edition in November. That sounds great. cheers



We are happy to announce that has reached A Royal Affair in Denmark, a total of 500,000 tickets sales, he now ranks among the top-3 of the historical films of the Danish film history.

Very fine.

In Germany saw this movie about 43 000 people.

Quote :
Die Königin und der Leibarzt: Der Film läuft immer noch in den deutschen Kinos, bis 24.5. haben den Film bisher knapp 43.000 Besucher gesehen.

That's not a big number, but it's only shown at the arthouse cinemas …
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PostSubject: Re: A Royal Affair   Fri Jun 08, 2012 10:18 am

I won't be able to see it until November!


ARRRRGGG!
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PostSubject: Re: A Royal Affair   Wed Jun 13, 2012 4:12 am

http://fr.kewego.com/video/e37c9493afes.html

Doesn't accept it to put it as video probably because isn't from youtube or daily. Sorry...

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PostSubject: Re: A Royal Affair   Fri Jun 15, 2012 6:58 am

EmpireOnline video:

Mads Mikkelsen Talks A Royal Affair
'I'm not the big romantic'
Danish actor Mads Mikkelsen makes no bones about a career spent at least partly over the Atlantic. "I'm engaged to Hollywood," he jokes. "If there's something I find I have to do, I'll do it. Otherwise I'll just stay home and have a vacation." Sure enough, his popcorn flicks (Clash Of The Titans, The Three Musketeers) have been mixed with arthouse films (Coco Chanel & Igor Stravinsky, Valhalla Rising) in recent times. His latest, acclaimed historical drama A Royal Affair, is made in his homeland of Denmark, where it's a romantic tale familiar to all schoolchildren. Mikkelsen plays royal physician Johann Struensee, a man whose eyes for the queen lead him into dangerous territory. We looked up the Danish for "love doctor" and went to meet him.

http://www.empireonline.com/interviews/interview.asp?IID=1519



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PostSubject: Re: A Royal Affair   Sun Jun 17, 2012 7:21 pm

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PostSubject: Re: A Royal Affair   Sun Jun 17, 2012 11:18 pm

Quote :
Mads Mikkelsen, interview

Mads Mikkelsen, ‘Casino Royale’ villain, talks about his starring role in a lavish new Danish drama.

By Tim Robey8:45AM BST 15 Jun 2012

Two days before I’m due to interview the Danish actor Mads Mikkelsen, he nabs the best actor award in Cannes for his much-lauded performance in Thomas Vinterberg’s The Hunt. A few days afterwards, it’s announced that he’s going to play Hannibal Lecter, in a new US television series about the early days of the doctor’s criminal career. And even as I’m flying out to Bucharest for the day, where Mikkelsen is shooting an action-comedy with Shia LaBeouf and Evan Rachel Wood, the internet is bubbling with rumours that he’s to join the Marvel Comics universe with a role in Thor 2.

It seems fair to say that Mikkelsen is busy – busy consolidating his credentials as an international star, and working very hard to nail all the opportunities currently being thrown his way. He’s still best-known to British audiences for playing Le Chiffre, the villain with the blood-weeping eye and the poker face in Casino Royale. The part may have been a coup and a profile-booster, but in no way has it pigeonholed him as a villain for hire. Mikkelsen’s emotional range and high-cheekboned handsomeness have always made him a thoroughly credible leading man – arguably the best in Denmark.

It’s in this capacity that he graces A Royal Affair, the 18th-century period piece we’re due to talk about, which premiered in Berlin and was the only film to win two major prizes there (screenplay, and best actor for his co-star).

Danish cinema isn’t especially renowned for its forays into historical costume drama, partly because of the relative expense of the genre in an industry with limited funds, and partly because you could say the words “Danish history” to a wide cross-section of potential filmgoers and be met with blank looks.

Consciously or not, we still associate Danish film with the Dogme movement – pictures both starkly contemporary in tone and entirely stripped-back in their production values, such as Vinterberg’s Festen (1998) and Susanne Bier’s Open Hearts (2002), which gave Mikkelsen an important early role. Breaking the mould, what’s dramatised here is a power-play of fascinating and scandalous significance in the country’s past, which stacks up against the most notorious of our own national crises.

Mikkelsen stars as Johann Friedrich Struensee, the German physician who became a confidant to the mentally ill King Christian VII, had an affair with his wife, Queen Caroline Mathilde, and then used his influence in parliament to become de facto regent of the state. Combining the political intrigue of a Cromwellian takeover bid with the furtive, but passionate, cuckolding of a king, it’s a love triangle so brimming with film potential I’m surprised the Danes haven’t had a crack at it before: a little googling reveals a German version from 1923, another in 1957, and even a 1935 British one called The Dictator, starring Clive Brook and Madeleine Carroll.

There’s no doubt that Mikkelsen, whose performance is moving, dignified and altogether tremendous, is pleased with the way this one turned out. When it premiered in Denmark, A Royal Affair achieved among the highest admission figures ever for a home-grown film, and it looks set to outperform The Avengers in its lifetime local run. The budget – €6.4 million (£5 million) – is less than four per cent of what that cost.

“I think it’s quite an achievement,” he says. “The budget was ridiculously low compared to what you can do in England or America with a film like that. I think Danish film is spreading in a fantastic way. And you still have that Dogme energy, even in a film like A Royal Affair.”

In industry terms, the Danes may have found their King’s Speech – a modestly produced movie whose wild success will embolden financiers to push the boat out on yet more ambitious projects. Parallels exist even in the storyline. The drama centres less on the tussle over Alicia Vikander’s young queen, more on the relationship between the sickly Christian (Mikkel Boe Følsgaard) and the kindly doctor whose only aim at first is to gain his trust.

“What exactly he was suffering from, Christian, we do not know. There are many guesses. We know that he loved Struensee. And Struensee loved him. He has no ambition in the beginning of changing anything, except for Christian. And then it takes over gradually, like every dictator in the world.”

Struensee’s reputation has always been a hugely volatile one, subject to the agendas of every successive generation in Denmark. “He’s got a street named after him in Copenhagen,” Mikkelsen tells me. “It’s a s----- street, but it’s there. It’s in the working-class area where I grew up, and I actually went to school in that street. We all knew the basics of this man taking over the country and shagging the queen and getting his head chopped off, but there are different versions. Historically you have versions where he’s a hero and versions where he’s a baddy. The city at the time had no idea that it was because of him that they had freedom of speech. He needed a spin-doctor, to convince them, ‘I’m really one of you’.”

A Royal Affair’s British release is well-timed, not just because of the post-Jubilee flood of fascination with monarchy, but because of the breakthrough success on television of the Scandinavian dramas The Killing, Borgen and The Bridge. “This might give our film a better chance,” Mikkelsen agrees. “Saturday after Saturday people have been listening to this strange accent, and that might build a bridge for us.”

After this, our next Mikkelsen encounter is likely to be The Hunt, which could even open in the UK before it does in Denmark. Having been pipped to that Berlin trophy by his debuting co-star, I can tell that he’s thrilled the Cannes prizes broke in his favour. “It’s the film’s award,” he concedes with impeccable modesty. “Well, I’ll take it! But you won’t be noticed in a film that’s average.”

The Hunt has won Vinterberg easily his best reviews since Festen. It tells the story of a kindergarten teacher falsely accused of touching a young girl, and the pervasive effect it has in his community. “My character’s trying to fight the accusations with reason and in a civilised manner,” explains Mikkelsen, “but he’s meeting a constant wall of feelings, and feelings do not go hand-in-hand with rationality.”

What a banner year it’s shaping up to be, for Danish film in general, and Mikkelsen in particular. I ask if the Bond role, six years ago now, made any of his contemporaries jealous at the time. “Well, Ulrich Thomsen definitely got a text,” he admits. “Ulrich’s character in The World is Not Enough dies, on, like, page 49, and I was like, guess what, I’m on page 89, and I’m still alive!” Still, Jesper Christensen’s shady kingpin Mr White has dodged all the bullets, having put an end to Le Chiffre and survived Quantum of Solace too.

“We can’t beat that,” Mikkelsen admits. “He’s got the record.”

Source: Telegraph
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PostSubject: Re: A Royal Affair   Mon Jun 18, 2012 3:10 am

I can hardly wait until it jumps the puddle over to the US...

Love

J
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PostSubject: Re: A Royal Affair   Mon Jun 18, 2012 6:03 am

Quote :
I can hardly wait until it jumps the puddle over to the US...

I wonder, if we'll get sooner the DVD.

Here some reviews from Great Britain:

Quote :
A Royal Affair

Posted on 2012-06-17 10:48:26 by lisakeddie

Released 15th June 2012

****

There is a heady and rousing whiff of corruption, scandal, passion and Enlightenment to delight the avid period drama fan in Danish director Nikolaj Arcel’s A Royal Affair. The fact that it is based on the true story of 15-year-old English princess Caroline Mathilde who was married off to unhinged King Christian in the 18thcentury gives it an added fascination and kudos than the average historical affair. And in a cinematic climate of superhero movies at present, a bit of Baroque decadence makes an appetising change.

En kongelig affære as it is known in Danish stars Alicia Vikander as the young queen Caroline, older and wiser beyond her years, who is married off to insane King Christain VII (Mikkel Følsgaard). The immature King behaves outrageously in society while holding his court to ransom, much to Caroline’s disgust.

It is the early 1770s when Enlightenment thinking is spreading fast across Europe and regal rule is being questioned by the socialists. In Denmark, one believer, a young German physician, Johann Friedrich Struensee (Mads Mikkelsen), successfully gets the position as Christian’s personal physician and begins to change the country’s way of ruling. He also starts a torrid love affair with the despairing young queen. Together they begin a revolution that changes a nation forever and seals their fate.
Visually, Arcel’s cinematography encompasses all the dark, dramatic mood of a Baroque masterpiece, perpetuating the emotional turmoil of the film’s characters further. Like a sedate Dangerous Liaisons the powerful mix of forbidden behaviour between a dynamic trio is a winning combination once more, so much so when the film has been so beautifully cast. Far from frivolous period dramatics, these three gradually feed off each others weaknesses and complexities, making what happens next an exciting mystery.

Serene Mikkelsen smoulders in this with his standard cool control, coupled with a seductive curl of the lip and flicker of flaming passion in the eye towards the angelic-looking and demure Vikander. What admittedly seems like an ill-matched pairing of acting talent at beginning becomes more accomplished as the story progresses. But the stage belongs to Følsgaard who pulls his character, Christian, to the bitter edge and back again, in a show of multiple personas, adding the only tomfoolery to an otherwise austere situation.

A Royal Affair is a beautifully nuanced and driven period drama at its finest with the added power of a true story behind it, making it a deserving box office hit to watch.

By Lisa Giles-Keddie

Source: Europe real com




Quote :
It's not easy being queen

Ed Gibbs, June 17, 2012

Reviewer rating:Rating: 50 out of 5 stars Reader rating:Rating: 15 out of 5 stars (6 votes)

A forgotten slice of Denmark's regal history resurfaces in this lavish period drama.

Something is rotten in the state of Denmark. Or at least, it was in the 18th century. For while radically progressive reforms were sweeping across Europe, the Danes were being ruled by a grim, iron fist. They had an inept, young king - clearly mentally unfit to rule - who allowed his council to favour land owners over the poor living in squalor, where disease and death were rife.
Nikolaj Arcel's sumptuous period epic - penned with his The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo co-scripter Rasmus Heisterberg - relives a fascinating, yet largely forgotten period in history with vigour and grace.

In keeping with the royal fashions of the time, a beautiful English princess, Caroline (played by rising star Vikander), is forced at age 15 to marry her cousin, King Christian VII.

Arriving in Denmark, the soon-to-be queen naturally expects her future husband to be sophisticated and culturally aware. Instead, she discovers, to her horror, Christian (Folsgaard) is a childlike, foul-mouthed fool, more interested in drinking and whoring his way around the palace than running his divided nation. It's little wonder all his advisers run circles around him, with very little effort required.

To complicate matters, Christian craves love and affection - at least in both a brotherly and motherly way.

With his scheming stepmother, Julianne (Dyrholm), hovering dangerously in the background, the young king takes a shine to his personal physician Johann Struensee (Mikkelsen) - who favours the ideas of the enlightenment, including ridding the poor of disease and redistributing wealth. Initially, he has the king's eye, rising rapidly to his own position of power concerning matters of the state, while also forging a forbidden romance with his queen.

Playing Struensee would be a challenge for any actor worth his salt. Wisely, then, the task falls at the feet of Mikkelsen, a man who last month won at Cannes (for his performance in Thomas Vinterberg's coming drama The Hunt) and, for his exemplary turn here, similarly triumphed in Berlin. His trophy cabinet ever expanding, Mikkelsen (the villain in Casino Royale) offers a heady blend of clarity and insight, with just the right degree of restraint.

Arcel's film conveys its subject so well, in fact, it defies its generous running time with aplomb. An 18th-century epic that harks back to the great film Amadeus in its detail and vision, A Royal Affair is one of the finest, most refreshing period dramas to emerge in a long time.

A ROYAL AFFAIR
Rated M, 138 minutes, opens Thursday
Stars: Mads Mikkelsen, Alicia Vikander, Mikkel Boe Folsgaard, Trine Dyrholm

Source: The Sydney Morning Herald





Quote :
A ROYAL AFFAIR

SYNOPSIS:

In 1766 Denmark, Caroline Mathilde (Alicia Vikander) is married to the unbalanced and politically ineffectual King Christian VII (Mikkel Boe Folsgard). Ignored by the wild King who lives scandalously, Caroline grows accustomed to a quiet existence in oppressed Copenhagen. When the King returns from a tour of Europe accompanied by Johann Struensee (Mads Mikkelsen), his new personal physician, Queen Caroline finds an unexpected ally at Court. The attraction of shared ideals and philosophy soon turns into a clandestine, passionate affair. Committed to the ideals of the Enlightenment that are banned in Denmark, Struensee convinces the King to assert his previously unused power to remove the archly conservative, church dominated political council and implement drastic changes to Danish society. As the Court plot their return to power and the downfall of the Queen and Struensee, the consequences of their affair are made clear and the entire nation will be changed forever. (Based on a true story.)

Review by Andrew L. Urban:
A fascinating story drawn from Danish history, A Royal Affair is a superbly executed historical drama with the guts of a great romantic tragedy and the scale of national significance. Alicia Vikander's warmly expressive face brings the young Queen Caroline into sharp focus, her every emotion clearly accessible. Our sympathies are instantly engaged as she is set up in an arranged marriage and travels from her native England to Copenhagen, full of bright hopes and happy expectations of a husband, King Christian VII (Mikkel Boe Folsgard) who seems to love the arts.

The King is a fop and a dilettante with no concept of ruling a country - one even as small as Denmark, something of a European backwater at the time. His Council consists of self serving power brokers with the church very much at the forefront.

Quickly disabused of her romantic notions about Christian, Caroline is a crushed and forlorn figure, when out of the European blue comes Dr Johann Struensee (Mads Mikkelsen). Picked up along his tour by her husband, the doctor is now Royal physician.

The good doctor is a modern man, a disciple of the Enlightenment, a movement that was driven by morality, keen to abolish slavery, torture, censorship and other oppressive practices of the so called nobility. This was a deadly dangerous philosophy and Caroline found it invigorating in Johann. The meeting of the minds soon led to a meeting of the bodies and the seed of their destruction was sown.

This royal love triangle is complex and layered, with each of the characters clearly articulated and meaningfully delivered. Trine Dyrholm as the duplicitous Dowger Queen and the strong support cast playing the scheming council members who are threatened by the potential wave of liberalisation all deliver superb performances.

Rasmus Videbæk's stunning images and a wonderful Gabriel Yared score (complemented by Vivaldi, Antonioni, and more) complete with flawless production design make this superior cinema. The tensions and dramas at every level - from the deeply personal to matters of state - are driven by a sense of authenticity with the underlying power of the gripping story. Director Nikolaj Arcel co-wrote the adaptation from Rasmus Heisterberg's book; it was Arcel who wrote the screenplay adaptation for the Millennium TV series and for the original feature film, The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. The screenplay has good genes.

For those so inclined, there is much that is relevant to our world today, including the many betrayals by the powerful and the self serving, and the immensely propulsive power of genuine love.

Review by Louise Keller:
Visually exquisite, the ingredients of this royal Danish historic drama are as sensational as they are gripping, with an arranged marriage to a simple-minded King, an adulterous affair, revolutionary ideas and treachery to steal the crown. Director Nikolaj Arcel (who penned the original adaptation of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo) has written a wonderful adaptation (from a novel by Bodil Steensen-Leth) with complex themes, brought to life by a superb cast and a great sense of place and time.

The very first shot of Caroline Mathilde (Alicia Vikander), standing by a mist-covered lake, an ancient castle in the background and surrounded by weeping trees, is breathtaking. It is the near end of the 18th century and the young Danish Queen in exile is pouring out her heart through quill and ink, recalling the events that have brought her to this day. It is about Johann Friedrich Struensee (Mads Mikkelsen), that she is compelled to write.

In flashback, the story begins on the day that Caroline, as a young English Princess meets Christian VII (Mikkel Boe Følsgaard), the King of Denmark, who is more excited to see his huge dog Gourmand, than his new bride in an arranged marriage. The child-like Christian, who clearly has one screw missing, is hooked on big breasted prostitutes, alcohol and masturbation and sees his beautiful, talented wife as potential threat for the limelight. Tellingly, he calls her Mother through most of the exposition.

As for Caroline, she is smart enough to realise she will be accepted in the Court if she entices her new husband into her bed chamber, but it isn't until she meets and beds the free-thinking doctor Johann, that she understand the meaning of love. Brought to the Court as the King's Physician by the scheming Rantzau (Thomas W. Gabrielsson) and Brandt (Cyron Bjørn Melville) for their own gains, Johann is a revolutionary, whose ideas include giving rights to peasants, limiting the influence of the church and abolishing corporal punishment and censorship. The scene at the Masquerade Ball, when Caroline and Johann dance together before a kiss is stolen and passions ignite, is filled with sexual urgency as their feelings are revealed.

The play for power comes from the scheming Dowager Queen Juliane (Trine Dyrholm), whose ambitions for her own son instigate the domino effect downfall. Mikkelsen is such an interesting actor and is perfect as the dashing doctor while Vikander is a breath of fresh air as the young queen. Følsgaard is as memorable as Tom Hulce in Amadeus as the repulsive, simple King who laughs inappropriately but who ultimately is a tragic and pathetic figure as he is manipulated right to the very end.

Historic fact aside, there is much to grapple with in this intriguing and scandalous drama in whose bewitching bubble we become absorbed.

Urban Cine File Australia




Quote :
NOT content with showing us how to make TV cop shows, the Danes are upstaging Brits in our most natural cinematic territory – the costume drama.

A Royal Affair tells the true story of the love Queen Caroline Mathilde (Alicia Vikander) had for the Danish King Christian VII’s personal doctor, Johan Struensee (Mads Mikkelsen) in the early 1770s.

The English-born Caroline felt no affection for the king who was a few jewels short of a crown and admitted he “liked hookers with big breasts”.

Beyond the love story there is the intrigue of free thinker Struensee’s rise to power.

It’s an intoxicating mix of politics, passion, history and tragedy, with humour too.

Mikkelsen and Vikander amply show their characters’ flaws, Mikkel Boe Folsgaard is brilliant as the unpredictable, misunderstood king.

If this wasn’t a foreign language film, it would be nominated for major awards.

RATING: FOUR STARS

The Sun




Quote :
A Royal Affair explores one of the most famous illicit romances in European history

By CHRIS TOOKEY
PUBLISHED: 23:21 GMT, 14 June 2012 | UPDATED: 00:30 GMT, 15 June 2012


A ROYAL AFFAIR (15)
Verdict: Danes reign
Rating: 4/5

Denmark is enjoying a creative renaissance, with top-class TV dramas such as The Killing and Borgen, and the rise of directors such as Nicolas Winding Refn (Drive).

Despite isolated hits such as Babette’s Feast (1987) and Festen (1998), the current revival started eight years ago, with a brave political drama called King’s Game, the most gripping depiction yet of the way spinning, leaking and lying to the public have come to dominate democratic politics.

That film was superbly written by Nikolaj Arcel and Rasmus Heisterberg, and ably directed by Arcel.

With A Royal Affair, the same duo has turned to the 18th century to examine one of the most famous illicit liaisons in European history.

There are echoes of Arthur, Lancelot and Guinevere in the moving tale of Caroline Mathilde (luminously played by star-of-the-future Alicia Vikander), a young Englishwoman sent to marry the feeble-minded Christian VII of Denmark (a Berlin Festival award-winning performance by Mikkel Boe Folsgaard).

Her subsequent affair with the king’s German physician (Mads Mikkelsen, an actor of immense authority) was not just a sex scandal. It dramatised the clash between the values of the Enlightenment and the religio-political establishment.

The film isn’t hard going, as the chemistry between Vikander and Mikkelsen is excellent, while the dotty Christian’s hopeless attempts at lovemaking and his petulant demands for a ‘fun queen’ offer light relief.

‘The world is full of princesses and I get stuck with the grumpy one,’ he grumbles.

We British may draw parallels with our Royal Family, which gives the film a cheeky topicality. But this is an intelligent, realistic costume drama of the kind we rarely see.

The last one on offer was The King’s Speech, and A Royal Affair deserves to reach the same mature audience. Though it is not on an epic scale, it is a thoughtful period piece that can stand comparison with Fred Zinnemann’s A Man For All Seasons and David Lean’s Doctor Zhivago.

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BeerIsFood
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PostSubject: Re: A Royal Affair   Tue Jun 19, 2012 10:43 pm

Today's the day!!!
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PostSubject: Re: A Royal Affair   Wed Jun 20, 2012 9:54 am

Be sure to tell us all about it!
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PostSubject: Re: A Royal Affair   Fri Jun 22, 2012 10:01 pm

Well, I loved it, what can I say. It was really beautifully filmed, Nikolaj is an amazing director with a great eye. He is obviously a very talented writer as well, and has been involved in some of my favourite films. I took an Italian friend with me, and she loved it! She remembered being taught something about it at school. I certainly don't.

Mads was amazing, and the chemistry between all 3 main actors worked so well. There were some scenes that we have seen on youtube that weren't in it. Caroline doesn't scream, crawling on the floor in the version I saw, which is one of Mads favourite scenes. Also, there was no masturbation in the bathtub scene for Alicia as reported in one of the articles I posted on the last forum. She just sits there.

The end of the film, the last half hour, is truly beautiful, and Mads' final scene, where he is beheaded, just assures you once again what a fine actor he is. That's a very strong scene, if you're not touched by it, you must be dead. Laughing

I don't understand why you have to wait until November, Empress, when it opens in New Zealand next week, and I think it has already opened in Australia. Why so late in the States?

But I shall definitely be looking for more of Arcel's work, and I hope he doesn't go too Hollywood.
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PostSubject: Re: A Royal Affair   Sat Jun 23, 2012 1:14 am

BeerIsFood wrote:
Caroline doesn't scream, crawling on the floor in the version I saw, which is one of Mads favourite scenes. Also, there was no masturbation in the bathtub scene for Alicia as reported in one of the articles I posted on the last forum. She just sits there.

The scream was in the German version. I think she was at his moment in Germany, after she was banned and heard, that Struensee was beheaded. She fell on the floor and screamed. It was only a very short scene. Just the scream.

Maybe the bathtub scene will come on the DVD-version. Or in a director-cut-version. But I don't miss the scene. Because it's not important for the character.

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PostSubject: Re: A Royal Affair   Sat Jun 23, 2012 1:26 am

No, she screams, but she doesn't crawl across the floor as I have seen in video clips. She screams till she's hoarse.
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PostSubject: Re: A Royal Affair   Sat Jun 23, 2012 1:37 am

scratch Could you link a video with that scene? Maybe I was wrong.

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PostSubject: Re: A Royal Affair   Sat Jun 23, 2012 1:52 am



At about 1.34/1.35 mins in, she is on the floor screaming, whereas in the film I saw, the camera is close up and she screams, bending forward, holding her stomach.
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